Discussion:
rescue Digest, Vol 135, Issue 8
(too old to reply)
Fred
2014-02-12 18:01:03 UTC
Permalink
Subj: rescue Digest, Vol 135, Issue 8
Subject: Re: [rescue] Caps on LCD monitors
There have been occasional publicised quality incidents, but basically
ALL such power boards have a limited lifespan. There will be a constant
stream of LCDs in dumpsters forever.
That's fine by me! More for me to fix and keep, donate, give to neighbors for
a home cooked meal, etc. My problem is having the time to fix and space
to keep once fixed. :)

... however I am only on person, and it's a shame that perfectly good LCD's
(sans bad caps) are being thrown out

Fred
Toby Thain
2014-02-13 02:49:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by Fred
Subj: rescue Digest, Vol 135, Issue 8
Subject: Re: [rescue] Caps on LCD monitors
There have been occasional publicised quality incidents, but basically
ALL such power boards have a limited lifespan. There will be a constant
stream of LCDs in dumpsters forever.
That's fine by me! More for me to fix and keep, donate, give to neighbors for
a home cooked meal, etc. My problem is having the time to fix and space
to keep once fixed. :)
... however I am only on person, and it's a shame that perfectly good LCD's
(sans bad caps) are being thrown out
It's outrageous.
--T
Post by Fred
Fred
_______________________________________________
rescue list - http://www.sunhelp.org/mailman/listinfo/rescue
hike
2014-02-13 04:13:42 UTC
Permalink
The cost of repair for a small business is more than the cost of a new LCD
monitor. Plus, the newer ones are better performing. A small business can
expense these and reduce their tax burden.

It is helpful to those who canbt afford LCD monitors and other PC
bstuffb
to receive them (gift/barter/etc.). When I used PCs, I would always hand
my old ones down to friends and family.

If you get a lot of the same model, you might have a friend who could learn
how to make these repairs.

Anyway, it is good of you to help others.
Post by Toby Thain
Subj: rescue Digest, Vol 135, Issue 8
Subject: Re: [rescue] Caps on LCD monitors
There have been occasional publicised quality incidents, but basically
ALL such power boards have a limited lifespan. There will be a constant
stream of LCDs in dumpsters forever.
That's fine by me! More for me to fix and keep, donate, give to neighbors for
a home cooked meal, etc. My problem is having the time to fix and space
to keep once fixed. :)
... however I am only on person, and it's a shame that perfectly good LCD's
(sans bad caps) are being thrown out
It's outrageous.
--T
Fred
_______________________________________________
rescue list - http://www.sunhelp.org/mailman/listinfo/rescue
_______________________________________________
rescue list - http://www.sunhelp.org/mailman/listinfo/rescue
Toby Thain
2014-02-13 04:18:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by hike
The cost of repair for a small business is more than the cost of a new LCD
monitor.
That's completely dysfunctional and we should work to change it.
Post by hike
Plus, the newer ones are better performing. A small business can
expense these and reduce their tax burden.
It is helpful to those who canbt afford LCD monitors and other PC
bstuffb
to receive them (gift/barter/etc.). When I used PCs, I would always hand
my old ones down to friends and family.
If you get a lot of the same model, you might have a friend who could learn
how to make these repairs.
The failure mode is the same, in 95% of cases, regardless of model.

One of the reasons I post about this is in the hope that others might
benefit.

--Toby
Post by hike
Anyway, it is good of you to help others.
Post by Toby Thain
Subj: rescue Digest, Vol 135, Issue 8
Subject: Re: [rescue] Caps on LCD monitors
There have been occasional publicised quality incidents, but basically
ALL such power boards have a limited lifespan. There will be a constant
stream of LCDs in dumpsters forever.
That's fine by me! More for me to fix and keep, donate, give to neighbors for
a home cooked meal, etc. My problem is having the time to fix and space
to keep once fixed. :)
... however I am only on person, and it's a shame that perfectly good LCD's
(sans bad caps) are being thrown out
It's outrageous.
--T
Fred
_______________________________________________
rescue list - http://www.sunhelp.org/mailman/listinfo/rescue
_______________________________________________
rescue list - http://www.sunhelp.org/mailman/listinfo/rescue
_______________________________________________
rescue list - http://www.sunhelp.org/mailman/listinfo/rescue
m***@zoho.com
2014-02-13 06:07:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by Toby Thain
Post by hike
The cost of repair for a small business is more than the cost of a new LCD
monitor.
That's completely dysfunctional and we should work to change it.
It might not even be true. Peter just said he fixed a bunch.
Post by Toby Thain
Post by hike
Plus, the newer ones are better performing. A small business can
expense these and reduce their tax burden.
Yes, a lot does depend on the laws, regulations, and taxes.
Mouse
2014-02-13 07:09:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by Toby Thain
Post by hike
The cost of repair for a small business is more than the cost of a
new LCD monitor.
That's completely dysfunctional and we should work to change it.
By making new ones more expensive, or making repairs cheaper? In
either case, how?
It might not even be true. Peter just said he fixed a bunch.
Yes...at what cost? I'm four for four, I think it is, at fixing LCD
flatscreens by re-capping. I'd be surprised if I would ever get to the
point of taking less than an hour to do one - and, at any realistic pay
rate for a decent electronics tech, that approaches the cost of a new
flatscreen. Add in the costs of reselling the fixed monitors and I'm
far from convinced it's not true. And that's not even considering
profit margin - and, in jurisdictions where it's an issue, liability.

Part of this is that the force multiplier of manufacturing technology
has made the making of a million flatscreens a whole lot less costly
than a million times the cost of making one. But the force multiplier
effect works a lot less effectively on repairs.

Yes, the current state is unsustainable in various ways. But I have
trouble seeing any way it's likely to change short of actually running
into its unsustainability. As a culture, we have got very good at
telling ourselves there is no problem, right up until the problem
becomes completely unavoidable. When there's no more gas in the corner
gas station's tank, it no longer works to tell yourself fuel shortages
don't exist - or are a problem for future generations who will work it
out "somehow". As cadmium - or gold - or oil or whatever - mines get
tapped out, it becomes less and less ignorable that we're burning
irreplacable (on human timescales) geologic capital by mining. But we
have become very, very good at ignoring such unpleasantnesses, so,
until we run up against those walls, I don't see things changing
significantly. I just count myself lucky I'm old enough I'll probably
be dead before things get _really_ uncomfortable.

/~\ The ASCII Mouse
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m***@zoho.com
2014-02-13 07:38:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mouse
Post by Toby Thain
Post by hike
The cost of repair for a small business is more than the cost of a
new LCD monitor.
That's completely dysfunctional and we should work to change it.
By making new ones more expensive, or making repairs cheaper? In
either case, how?
It might not even be true. Peter just said he fixed a bunch.
Yes...at what cost? I'm four for four, I think it is, at fixing LCD
flatscreens by re-capping. I'd be surprised if I would ever get to the
point of taking less than an hour to do one - and, at any realistic pay
rate for a decent electronics tech, that approaches the cost of a new
flatscreen. Add in the costs of reselling the fixed monitors and I'm
far from convinced it's not true. And that's not even considering
profit margin - and, in jurisdictions where it's an issue, liability.
They've come down a lot but commodity el-cheapo flatscreens here cost about
150 bucks for a decent (by our ratty standards) 19.5 inch. They don't pay
what passes for technicians here two hundred bucks a day. I think it would
be closer to 14 USD an hour- and from my experience, they're about 14 dollars
overpaid. But I digress... I guess depends a lot on where. Most markets are
much smaller than North America and most places the prices are much higher
than in North America. Here, it definitely makes sense when you can pay one
guy to (sortof) fix 8 screens and sell them for let's say 800 dollars for
112 dollars in labor and whatever a new cheap set of Chinese caps cost.
Peter Corlett
2014-02-13 18:45:20 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, Feb 13, 2014 at 07:38:34AM +0000, ***@zoho.com wrote:
[...]
Post by m***@zoho.com
They've come down a lot but commodity el-cheapo flatscreens here cost about
150 bucks for a decent (by our ratty standards) 19.5 inch. They don't pay
what passes for technicians here two hundred bucks a day. I think it would be
closer to 14 USD an hour- and from my experience, they're about 14 dollars
overpaid. But I digress... I guess depends a lot on where. Most markets are
much smaller than North America and most places the prices are much higher
than in North America. Here, it definitely makes sense when you can pay one
guy to (sortof) fix 8 screens and sell them for let's say 800 dollars for 112
dollars in labor and whatever a new cheap set of Chinese caps cost.
The UK is a smaller market, and I also happen to be a company director here.

My company can buy said ratty 19.5" monitors new for #64.19, which is $106.86
at the current exchange rate. Meanwhile a *minimum wage* employee costs
#7.76[0] or $12.87 per hour. But I'd need staff to not only repair the
monitors, but also collect the dead units being thrown out, sell the repaired
units, and deal with returns.

I'd only scrape a very meagre profit from it at best, and it has a high
opportunity cost compared to just selling new monitors, or indeed doing the
profitable consultancy that the company was originally set up for. In practice,
those monitors would fall into the category of consumable hardware that's paid
for out of petty cash.

However, I *do* fix my kit off-the-clock for fun and because I'm a tight-fisted
Northerner who hates waste, but I know to toss it when it's beyond my abilities
or the repaired unit is still dysfunctional enough that it's not really worth
using.


[0] The official headline figure of #6.31 is what the employee sees on their
payslip, with employer NI and accumulation of holiday entitlement
accounting for the remainder. There are possibly further costs that I'm
unaware of.
Phil Stracchino
2014-02-13 13:01:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mouse
As a culture, we have got very good at
telling ourselves there is no problem, right up until the problem
becomes completely unavoidable. When there's no more gas in the corner
gas station's tank, it no longer works to tell yourself fuel shortages
don't exist - or are a problem for future generations who will work it
out "somehow".
This, this, a thousand times this. We always want to make the hard
problems someone else's problem.
--
Phil Stracchino
Babylon Communications
***@caerllewys.net
***@co.ordinate.org
Landline: 603.293.8485
hike
2014-02-13 13:38:54 UTC
Permalink
Yes, we are very good and successful at that. And it benefits us all.
Post by Phil Stracchino
Post by Mouse
As a culture, we have got very good at
telling ourselves there is no problem, right up until the problem
becomes completely unavoidable. When there's no more gas in the corner
gas station's tank, it no longer works to tell yourself fuel shortages
don't exist - or are a problem for future generations who will work it
out "somehow".
This, this, a thousand times this. We always want to make the hard
problems someone else's problem.
--
Phil Stracchino
Babylon Communications
Landline: 603.293.8485
_______________________________________________
rescue list - http://www.sunhelp.org/mailman/listinfo/rescue
Toby Thain
2014-02-13 13:37:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mouse
Post by Toby Thain
Post by hike
The cost of repair for a small business is more than the cost of a
new LCD monitor.
That's completely dysfunctional and we should work to change it.
By making new ones more expensive, or making repairs cheaper? In
either case, how?
Both.

A $100 (probably not a sustainable price, given that it's full of
nonrenewables) screen that is held hostage by an 18c resistor (in one
case of a 24" Samsung that probably cost $400+) or $2 worth of caps ...
does anyone see a problem here?
Post by Mouse
It might not even be true. Peter just said he fixed a bunch.
Yes...at what cost? I'm four for four, I think it is, at fixing LCD
flatscreens by re-capping. ...
Yes, the current state is unsustainable in various ways. But I have
trouble seeing any way it's likely to change short of actually running
into its unsustainability. ...
That's assured.

Human nature's great, eh.

--T
Post by Mouse
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Lionel Peterson
2014-02-13 14:24:15 UTC
Permalink
Yeah, the 'living wage' of the person that will replace that 18 cent
resistor or $2 handful of caps. I don't mean that as an attack on living
wages per se, but that is the barrier. If those handful of failed parts
were user-replaceable that would be one thing (think tube TVs and tube
testers in local stores), but that is not the case.

Lionel
Post by Toby Thain
Post by hike
The cost of repair for a small business is more than the cost of a
Post by Toby Thain
Post by hike
new LCD monitor.
That's completely dysfunctional and we should work to change it.
By making new ones more expensive, or making repairs cheaper? In
either case, how?
Both.
A $100 (probably not a sustainable price, given that it's full of
nonrenewables) screen that is held hostage by an 18c resistor (in one case
of a 24" Samsung that probably cost $400+) or $2 worth of caps ... does
anyone see a problem here?
Post by hike
It might not even be true. Peter just said he fixed a bunch.
Yes...at what cost? I'm four for four, I think it is, at fixing LCD
flatscreens by re-capping. ...
Yes, the current state is unsustainable in various ways. But I have
trouble seeing any way it's likely to change short of actually running
into its unsustainability. ...
That's assured.
Human nature's great, eh.
--T
Post by hike
/~\ The ASCII Mouse
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_______________________________________________
rescue list - http://www.sunhelp.org/mailman/listinfo/rescue
_______________________________________________
rescue list - http://www.sunhelp.org/mailman/listinfo/rescue
--
Lionel Peterson
***@gmail.com
hike
2014-02-13 21:07:48 UTC
Permalink
The skill set required to successfully repair the failed caps is limited to
a small set of people these days. Once, the average person could do this
but not today. I took electronics technology in high school but it was not
a practical course like tv/radio/stereo repair courses. I never learned to
solder since I didnbt play with these things.
Post by Lionel Peterson
Yeah, the 'living wage' of the person that will replace that 18 cent
resistor or $2 handful of caps. I don't mean that as an attack on living
wages per se, but that is the barrier. If those handful of failed parts
were user-replaceable that would be one thing (think tube TVs and tube
testers in local stores), but that is not the case.
Lionel
Post by Toby Thain
Post by hike
The cost of repair for a small business is more than the cost of a
Post by Toby Thain
Post by hike
new LCD monitor.
That's completely dysfunctional and we should work to change it.
By making new ones more expensive, or making repairs cheaper? In
either case, how?
Both.
A $100 (probably not a sustainable price, given that it's full of
nonrenewables) screen that is held hostage by an 18c resistor (in one
case
Post by Toby Thain
of a 24" Samsung that probably cost $400+) or $2 worth of caps ... does
anyone see a problem here?
Post by hike
It might not even be true. Peter just said he fixed a bunch.
Yes...at what cost? I'm four for four, I think it is, at fixing LCD
flatscreens by re-capping. ...
Yes, the current state is unsustainable in various ways. But I have
trouble seeing any way it's likely to change short of actually running
into its unsustainability. ...
That's assured.
Human nature's great, eh.
--T
Post by hike
/~\ The ASCII Mouse
\ / Ribbon Campaign
/ \ Email! 7D C8 61 52 5D E7 2D 39 4E F1 31 3E E8 B3 27 4B
_______________________________________________
rescue list - http://www.sunhelp.org/mailman/listinfo/rescue
_______________________________________________
rescue list - http://www.sunhelp.org/mailman/listinfo/rescue
--
Lionel Peterson
_______________________________________________
rescue list - http://www.sunhelp.org/mailman/listinfo/rescue
Nick B
2014-02-13 21:17:34 UTC
Permalink
Either your idea of "average" people is very different from mine, or you've
never done tech support...
I'm not sure I'd trust 1 in 10 people to solder, much less solder on a
modern multi-layer mostly-SMD board.
Nick
Post by hike
The skill set required to successfully repair the failed caps is limited to
a small set of people these days. Once, the average person could do this
but not today. I took electronics technology in high school but it was not
a practical course like tv/radio/stereo repair courses. I never learned to
solder since I didnb t play with these things.
Post by Lionel Peterson
Yeah, the 'living wage' of the person that will replace that 18 cent
resistor or $2 handful of caps. I don't mean that as an attack on living
wages per se, but that is the barrier. If those handful of failed parts
were user-replaceable that would be one thing (think tube TVs and tube
testers in local stores), but that is not the case.
Lionel
Post by Toby Thain
Post by hike
The cost of repair for a small business is more than the cost of a
Post by Toby Thain
Post by hike
new LCD monitor.
That's completely dysfunctional and we should work to change it.
By making new ones more expensive, or making repairs cheaper? In
either case, how?
Both.
A $100 (probably not a sustainable price, given that it's full of
nonrenewables) screen that is held hostage by an 18c resistor (in one
case
Post by Toby Thain
of a 24" Samsung that probably cost $400+) or $2 worth of caps ... does
anyone see a problem here?
Post by hike
It might not even be true. Peter just said he fixed a bunch.
Yes...at what cost? I'm four for four, I think it is, at fixing LCD
flatscreens by re-capping. ...
Yes, the current state is unsustainable in various ways. But I have
trouble seeing any way it's likely to change short of actually running
into its unsustainability. ...
That's assured.
Human nature's great, eh.
--T
Post by hike
/~\ The ASCII Mouse
\ / Ribbon Campaign
/ \ Email! 7D C8 61 52 5D E7 2D 39 4E F1 31 3E E8 B3 27 4B
_______________________________________________
rescue list - http://www.sunhelp.org/mailman/listinfo/rescue
_______________________________________________
rescue list - http://www.sunhelp.org/mailman/listinfo/rescue
--
Lionel Peterson
_______________________________________________
rescue list - http://www.sunhelp.org/mailman/listinfo/rescue
_______________________________________________
rescue list - http://www.sunhelp.org/mailman/listinfo/rescue
Rjtoegel
2014-02-14 00:17:37 UTC
Permalink
You are being nice. More like 1 in 100 at least. BTW, I've been soldering
since high school and kids are amazed when I solder something at school.

Bob
Post by Nick B
Either your idea of "average" people is very different from mine, or you've
never done tech support...
I'm not sure I'd trust 1 in 10 people to solder, much less solder on a
modern multi-layer mostly-SMD board.
Nick
Post by hike
The skill set required to successfully repair the failed caps is limited to
a small set of people these days. Once, the average person could do this
but not today. I took electronics technology in high school but it was not
a practical course like tv/radio/stereo repair courses. I never learned to
solder since I didnb t play with these things.
Post by Lionel Peterson
Yeah, the 'living wage' of the person that will replace that 18 cent
resistor or $2 handful of caps. I don't mean that as an attack on living
wages per se, but that is the barrier. If those handful of failed parts
were user-replaceable that would be one thing (think tube TVs and tube
testers in local stores), but that is not the case.
Lionel
Post by Toby Thain
Post by hike
The cost of repair for a small business is more than the cost of a
Post by Toby Thain
Post by hike
new LCD monitor.
That's completely dysfunctional and we should work to change it.
By making new ones more expensive, or making repairs cheaper? In
either case, how?
Both.
A $100 (probably not a sustainable price, given that it's full of
nonrenewables) screen that is held hostage by an 18c resistor (in one
case
Post by Toby Thain
of a 24" Samsung that probably cost $400+) or $2 worth of caps ... does
anyone see a problem here?
Post by hike
It might not even be true. Peter just said he fixed a bunch.
Yes...at what cost? I'm four for four, I think it is, at fixing LCD
flatscreens by re-capping. ...
Yes, the current state is unsustainable in various ways. But I have
trouble seeing any way it's likely to change short of actually running
into its unsustainability. ...
That's assured.
Human nature's great, eh.
--T
Post by hike
/~\ The ASCII Mouse
\ / Ribbon Campaign
/ \ Email! 7D C8 61 52 5D E7 2D 39 4E F1 31 3E E8 B3 27 4B
_______________________________________________
rescue list - http://www.sunhelp.org/mailman/listinfo/rescue
_______________________________________________
rescue list - http://www.sunhelp.org/mailman/listinfo/rescue
--
Lionel Peterson
_______________________________________________
rescue list - http://www.sunhelp.org/mailman/listinfo/rescue
_______________________________________________
rescue list - http://www.sunhelp.org/mailman/listinfo/rescue
_______________________________________________
rescue list - http://www.sunhelp.org/mailman/listinfo/rescue
hike
2014-02-14 17:21:19 UTC
Permalink
1930bs-1960bs saw a tremendous number of people working with old-style
radios. Heathkit was in its prime and everybody tried their hand. Ham
radios were built and not bought. The USA space program and all the
miniturization created the complexity and schools stopped teaching this
type of stuff. It was the time before belectronicsb became the norm.
Ibm
older than dirt and remember these things.
Post by Nick B
Either your idea of "average" people is very different from mine, or you've
never done tech support...
I'm not sure I'd trust 1 in 10 people to solder, much less solder on a
modern multi-layer mostly-SMD board.
Nick
Post by hike
The skill set required to successfully repair the failed caps is limited
to
Post by hike
a small set of people these days. Once, the average person could do this
but not today. I took electronics technology in high school but it was
not
Post by hike
a practical course like tv/radio/stereo repair courses. I never learned
to
Post by hike
solder since I didnb t play with these things.
Post by Lionel Peterson
Yeah, the 'living wage' of the person that will replace that 18 cent
resistor or $2 handful of caps. I don't mean that as an attack on
living
Post by hike
Post by Lionel Peterson
wages per se, but that is the barrier. If those handful of failed parts
were user-replaceable that would be one thing (think tube TVs and tube
testers in local stores), but that is not the case.
Lionel
Post by Toby Thain
Post by hike
The cost of repair for a small business is more than the cost of a
Post by Toby Thain
Post by hike
new LCD monitor.
That's completely dysfunctional and we should work to change it.
By making new ones more expensive, or making repairs cheaper? In
either case, how?
Both.
A $100 (probably not a sustainable price, given that it's full of
nonrenewables) screen that is held hostage by an 18c resistor (in one
case
Post by Toby Thain
of a 24" Samsung that probably cost $400+) or $2 worth of caps ...
does
Post by hike
Post by Lionel Peterson
Post by Toby Thain
anyone see a problem here?
Post by hike
It might not even be true. Peter just said he fixed a bunch.
Yes...at what cost? I'm four for four, I think it is, at fixing LCD
flatscreens by re-capping. ...
Yes, the current state is unsustainable in various ways. But I have
trouble seeing any way it's likely to change short of actually
running
Post by hike
Post by Lionel Peterson
Post by Toby Thain
Post by hike
into its unsustainability. ...
That's assured.
Human nature's great, eh.
--T
Post by hike
/~\ The ASCII Mouse
\ / Ribbon Campaign
/ \ Email! 7D C8 61 52 5D E7 2D 39 4E F1 31 3E E8 B3 27
4B
Post by hike
Post by Lionel Peterson
Post by Toby Thain
Post by hike
_______________________________________________
rescue list - http://www.sunhelp.org/mailman/listinfo/rescue
_______________________________________________
rescue list - http://www.sunhelp.org/mailman/listinfo/rescue
--
Lionel Peterson
_______________________________________________
rescue list - http://www.sunhelp.org/mailman/listinfo/rescue
_______________________________________________
rescue list - http://www.sunhelp.org/mailman/listinfo/rescue
_______________________________________________
rescue list - http://www.sunhelp.org/mailman/listinfo/rescue
Mike Meredith
2014-02-16 11:59:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by hike
The skill set required to successfully repair the failed caps is
limited to a small set of people these days. Once, the average
As others have said, I suspect you underestimate the number of people
who have the necessary skills.

In a more general sense, it turns out there are others who have noticed
this "gap in the market" for repairing old electronics :-

http://therestartproject.org/

Turns out they're quite popular.

[demime 1.01d removed an attachment of type application/pgp-signature which had a name of signature.asc]
hike
2014-02-16 13:53:55 UTC
Permalink
It appears that you mis-read my statementbunless you believe a large set
(>50%) of people these days have the skill set required to successfully
repair the failed caps. One person wrote that he thought 10% of the
population could solder; Another wrote 1%; I wrote bsmallb and that
should
cover 1%-49%. I took several classes in high school but they were all
engineering prep classes and not technician classes. The guys in the
technician classes are all either managers or retired and arenbbt
soldering
anymore. That vocational program at my high school was eliminated decades
ago so they arenbt producing any more solderers. My PC Engineering class,
taken in the 1990bs was a DOS/Windows/swap a board/install memory, hard
drive, cd course with no soldering and no thought of soldering. The local
bradiob vocational college morphed to computer related concentrations and
radiological courses.
Post by Mike Meredith
Post by hike
The skill set required to successfully repair the failed caps is
limited to a small set of people these days. Once, the average
As others have said, I suspect you underestimate the number of people
who have the necessary skills.
In a more general sense, it turns out there are others who have noticed
this "gap in the market" for repairing old electronics :-
http://therestartproject.org/
Turns out they're quite popular.
[demime 1.01d removed an attachment of type application/pgp-signature
which had a name of signature.asc]
_______________________________________________
rescue list - http://www.sunhelp.org/mailman/listinfo/rescue
Lionel Peterson
2014-02-13 14:08:47 UTC
Permalink
I recently picked up 4 perfectly good Dell 1702 flat panel displays for
$20/each - at that price they are cheap backups/gifts for friends.

As mouse alluded to (but did not enumerate) there are many, many more costs
in repairing electronics than the cost of the technician.

You need to advertise, either provide delivery/pick-up service OR have a
'main street' retail location (at double the rent of a similar space in an
industrial park), storage space to hold items to be worked on, a work area,
a space to hold fixed items until retrieved/returned, and a method for
recovering costs when items get abandoned at the shop. Add in parts
inventory, training to be certified to perform warranty work,
heat/electricity and a profit and it's very expensive.

I paid $20/ea for four 6 year-old flat panels, I would estimate a repair
service would want at least $50/60 flat fee for such a repair, and I'd need
to have another panel to use while my broken one is out for repair. And
deep down, despite knowing that it's the right thing to do, I'd rather buy
a new (better) display and recycle the broken one than spend half as much
on repairing a display that already broke once.

I ran the numbers a couple years ago when I thought about opening up a
computer 'repair' shop, and in my area retail space goes for $2/sq ft per
month (1,000 sq ft shop is about $2K/month), figuring on a payroll of one
person (me) at $50K/yr and if the shop is constantly busy (a big if), I
needed to charge $60-70/hr - I couldn't see that being successful.

There's an 'electronic' service shop in the next town over - he does about
80-85% warranty work! the rest bills at about $50/hr and is typically a
repair to an old tube amp or transistor receiver. He used to offer a
pickup/drop off service, but at $125 flat rate, it wasn't sustainable...

The economics of the business of repairing electronics just isn't there (in
most cases)...

Lionel
Post by Mouse
Post by Toby Thain
Post by hike
The cost of repair for a small business is more than the cost of a
new LCD monitor.
That's completely dysfunctional and we should work to change it.
By making new ones more expensive, or making repairs cheaper? In
either case, how?
It might not even be true. Peter just said he fixed a bunch.
Yes...at what cost? I'm four for four, I think it is, at fixing LCD
flatscreens by re-capping. I'd be surprised if I would ever get to the
point of taking less than an hour to do one - and, at any realistic pay
rate for a decent electronics tech, that approaches the cost of a new
flatscreen. Add in the costs of reselling the fixed monitors and I'm
far from convinced it's not true. And that's not even considering
profit margin - and, in jurisdictions where it's an issue, liability.
--
Lionel Peterson
***@gmail.com
Phil Stracchino
2014-02-13 14:17:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lionel Peterson
There's an 'electronic' service shop in the next town over - he does about
80-85% warranty work! the rest bills at about $50/hr and is typically a
repair to an old tube amp or transistor receiver. He used to offer a
pickup/drop off service, but at $125 flat rate, it wasn't sustainable...
The economics of the business of repairing electronics just isn't there (in
most cases)...
Especially these days when so many consumer electronic products just
have a single board mostly populated with custom VLSI. To all practical
purposes they are non-repairable; all you can do is swap the entire board.
--
Phil Stracchino
Babylon Communications
***@caerllewys.net
***@co.ordinate.org
Landline: 603.293.8485
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